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Virtual Narcan Training

Virtual Narcan Training

Jul 07, 2020
5:00pm to 7:00pm

Every day in New York City, about 3 people die from a drug overdose. This brief online training will teach you how to recognize and reverse an opioid overdose. You will become a...

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Latest News

Preclinical Study Links Human Gene Variant to THC Reward in Adolescent Females

cannabis

A common variation in a human gene that affects the brain’s reward processing circuit increases vulnerability to the rewarding effects of the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis in adolescent females, but not males, according to preclinical research by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators. As adolescence represents a highly sensitive period of brain development with the highest risk for initiating cannabis use, these findings in mice have important implications for understanding the influence of genetics on cannabis dependence in humans.

Learning Safety Signals May Reduce Fear and Anxiety

Learning to associate distinct signals with safety has been shown by researchers to reduce fear and anxiety. Now, a study by investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian and Yale University demonstrates that these safety signals activate different circuits in the brain from those involved in typical anxiety therapy, suggesting the approach may enhance treatments for individuals with anxiety disorders or serve as an alternative to current interventions.

Recognizing Safety Signals May Reduce Fear and Anxiety

Learning to associate distinct signals with safety has been shown by researchers to reduce fear and anxiety. Now, a study by investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian and Yale University demonstrates that these safety signals activate different circuits in the brain from those involved in typical anxiety therapy, suggesting the approach may enhance treatments for individuals with anxiety disorders or serve as an alternative to current interventions.

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Annual Holiday Newsletter

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